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(12/13/17): Pictures: Priyanka Chopra on Quantico Set (December 13) Priyanka was seen on the Quantico set today. I upl.....
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Priyanka is interviewed in the latest Filmfare issue. She talks about Baywatch, conquering the west and her zest for adventure. I uploaded the scans below!


Gallery Links:

Home > Magazines > 2017 > Filmfare – July 8, 2017












Hello! We are starting part 2 of the project and I hope you will all join me 🙂 For this part we will be making a video, however it won’t be your typical Happy Birthday video. I’ve had this this idea brewing in my head since Priyanka was named UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador last year, but with her recent trip to Africa I’m even more determined to bring this to life. SO, I thought it would be a good idea if we all came together as fans and create a campaign video to further spread awareness about child sexual assault. Now, how exactly will this work? Participation is key and requires some effort from you. I know that Priyanka fans are especially creative, so this is your chance to show off your creativity AND spread awareness at the same time.

The basics

• The video will include fans sharing facts about child sexaul assault. You are encouraged to share your fact through any creative platform you see fit. You can record a video of yourself clearly stating your fact. You can decorate a poster or sign with your fact written on it and take a picture of yourself holding your sign. Or if you don’t want to be on camera then just take a picture of your sign. You can make a graphic/edit in photoshop with your fact. OR any other creative way you would like to share. The more creative the better! The sky’s the limit.

• So to make sure I don’t have a dozen of the same facts, if you want to be a part of this video then get in touch with me and I will assign you a fact. ONLY if you’re serious please! You can write to me on Twitter, Instagram or email.

The deadline for all submissions is July 10th. This gives you plenty of time and if you don’t submit your video on time then I will just assign your fact to someone else!

• When sending in your video be sure to include your name, Twitter (if you want) and location!

• If you have any questions regarding this video then don’t hesitate to contact me!


While it is fun to put something like this together, sexual assault is a serious matter, so please be mature and respectful when on camera.






Priyanka Chopra, 34, is a singer-actress who has appeared in more than 50 Indian films. She stars on ABC’s “Quantico” and in the new action-comedy film “Baywatch.” She spoke with Marc Myers.

Hospitals still make me queasy. When I was growing up in India in the 1980s, both of my parents were doctors. After school, I’d play at the hospital with the nurses until my mother finished working. The smell of formaldehyde was overpowering and the sight of blood made me lightheaded. Med school was out.

My parents were overachievers, to say the least. My father, Ashok, was a general surgeon and, in his spare time, a musician and artist. My mother, Madhu, is a gynecologist and an ear, nose and throat doctor who studied Indian classical dance and was a licensed pilot.

Surprisingly, my parents never placed those demands on my younger brother, Siddharth, or me. Instead, they were supportive of whatever we wanted to do. They just wanted us to be happy.

My parents were in the Indian Army, so we relocated to different bases every two years. When I was 5, being uprooted was hard. To help ease the anxiety, my father turned the moves into a game.

He told me that moving would give me a chance to reinvent myself. When we moved, he said, there would be new people who didn’t know me, and I could start over. Positioned that way, moving sounded intriguing, and it worked.

The town I remember most growing up was Bareilly, about five hours east of New Delhi. I was in the fifth grade, and we lived in an army barracks that housed four families. I was what you’d call a tomboy. I ran around with the boys and climbed things in search of adventure.

My mother was often busy at work with her patients and only cooked on special occasions. The rest of the time we had a really good cook. Despite my parents’ schedules, we usually managed to eat one meal together every day as a family.

My brother and I had a nanny. But no matter where we lived, my grandmother, Mary John Akhouri, swooped in to look after us for a time.

When I turned 14, I spent the summer of 1996 visiting my mother’s sister and my three cousins in Queens, N.Y. My father had always insisted I follow my heart, so I asked my aunt if I could stay and go to school there. America was so exciting.

We spoke with my parents and they agreed. For six months, I went to Robert F. Kennedy High School in Flushing, Queens. Then my aunt changed jobs and moved us to Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

We lived in a four-bedroom apartment in a complex. It was one of the best experiences. We were the only Indian family in the area, but our neighbors were so warm and kind.

After 10th grade, I moved to my uncle’s house in Newton, Mass. Like most teenage girls, I had major self-esteem issues. I was skinny and gawky, and a girl in school constantly bullied me, calling me “curry.” There was no getting her to stop. At the end of 11th grade, I decided to return to India to finish high school. By then, I was all grown up and had discovered mascara and lipstick, which came as a shock to my brother and father. My mother was a different story.

At 17, I had photos taken for a college-scholarship application. The photographer said I was pretty and asked if he could take modeling photos. Unknown to me, my mom sent the photos to the Miss India Beauty Pageant.

To everyone’s surprise, I won. My dad wasn’t happy. Boys started coming around. One even tried to come down through the roof.

I automatically was entered in Miss World, and I won that pageant, too. Immediately after, I was offered Indian film roles.

Initially, I had to balance film work with my aeronautical engineering studies at the university. But as acting demands grew over the next two years, I had to make a decision.

I turned to my dad. He said, “Look, if you love to act, see how it goes. You don’t want to wake up one day and have a what-if moment. If it doesn’t work out, you can always return to school.”

So I left college and was in more than 50 films in India between 2003 and 2016. I learned to act by studying more experienced actors on the set and in films.

In 2010, I met my U.S. manager, Anjula Acharia, and signed a global recording deal with Universal. Five years later, I signed with ABC, eventually auditioning for “Quantico” and getting a lead role.

Today, I have homes in New York and in Mumbai, where I moved into my own place after my father died in 2013. In New York, I live in a duplex apartment on the Upper East Side. I love watching old American and Indian movies in my screening room.

My mom and I talk all the time by phone and FaceTime when I’m in the States. If she hears me sneeze, she’s on the next flight to New York.

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